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Lewis & Clark Corps of Discovery

Journals: 1803

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Meriwether Lewis, William Clark
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1804 1805 1806

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1803
July August September October November December
July 5
1803
Meriwether Lewis Departs Washington, D.C. for Pittsburgh Washington, D.C. Pennsylvania Pittsburgh Legacy
July 15
1803
Meriwether Lewis Arrives in Pittsburgh to Prepare for the Expedition
Pennsylvania Lewis & Clark Map: 07/15/1803 Pittsburgh Legacy
  • Pittsburgh Area Lewis and Clark Bicentennial Commemoration.
  • Aug 31
    1803
    Meriwether Lewis Departs Pittsburgh to Join William Clark in Louisville.

    Lewis: At about 11 o'clock we left Pittsburgh with a party of about 11 people. We stopped at Bruno's Island and I tried out my new airgun. Unfortunately, when Mr. Cenas fired the gun a shot hit a woman and grazed her temple, there was a lot of blood but she is fine now. When we left the island the river was very low and in one spot we had to get out and lift the boat about 30 yards. After a long hard day we enjoyed some whiskey and went to bed at 8 o'clock.
    Pennsylvania Kentucky Medicine Lewis & Clark Map: 08/31/1803

  • Pittsburgh Area Lewis and Clark Bicentennial Commemoration.
  • Sep 1
    1803
    Lewis: When we awoke this morning the water was covered with a thick fog, we could only see 40 paces in front of us. We waited until the sun melted away the fog and proceeded at 8 o'clock. Fog seems to be very common in Ohio at this time of year. We ran into much difficulty today on account of the riffle called Woolery's Trap. We had to unload all of the boat's contents try and lift the boat over the trap. Finding this impractical we found a man with a team of oxen to help us. With all of this difficulty we stayed and remained all night, having made only ten miles today.
    Pennsylvania Weather Keelboats The Ohio River
    Sep 2
    1803
    Lewis: Today we set out at sunrise but encountered a riffle after 2 1/2 miles. We got out and pulled the boat over it, which took a lot of energy. At nine o'clock we reached the Logtown Riffle which detained us for four hours. We paid a man a dollar to pull us over with a horse and an ox. Many people who live here live off the money made by travelers in trouble. We passed the mouth of two little creeks to the north and ran into another riffle but we made it through alright. The thermometer stood at about 76 in the cabin and about the same when stuck in the river. I noticed that the leaves of the buckeye, Gum and sassafras have begun to fade and turn red.
    Pennsylvania Business Trees The Ohio River
    Sep 3
    1803
    Lewis: It was foggy again when I woke up this morning and about 63 degrees Fahrenheit. Even the river was about 75 degrees, the 12 degree difference is what makes the vapor. Because of the fog we were unable to start until 9 o'clock this morning. A wealthy merchant of Philadelphia, Mr. Gui Briant, arrived with two boats filled with furs. Mr. Briant said that if I can reach the Georgetown Bar, 24 miles away, I will be okay. We passed a riffle just below Big Beaver Creek. Later, we anchored at Mackintosh and I discharged one of my hands. We passed another riffle below Makintosh and pressed on. Another 3 miles on we hit another riffle that forced us to unload and drag the boat over with horses. We stayed all night having traveled only 6 miles..
    Pennsylvania Weather The Ohio River
    Sep 4
    1803
    Lewis: Fog again this morning and we had to wait until a little past 8 to set out. I observed that the river has seemed to fall about an inch over the night. A small boat that we bought, to lighten our load, sprung a leak and we lost hardware that was supposed to be presents for the Indians. With help from some people in Georgetown we made it over the bar. At Georgetown we purchased a canoe, two paddles and two poles for $11. We made camp early, only making about 13 miles today. Before we retired we opened the articles that got wet and laid them out in the sun. I also ordered some of the men to repair the canoes. Luckily the articles were not as damaged as I thought. I hired another hand to travel with us as for as Wheeling. My camp is about two miles away from the line that divides Virginia and Pennsylvania and on the west of that the state of Ohio. The water is so low and clear that we can see many fish. We crave all of the beautiful sturgeon, bass and pike....so we set to the task of sharpening spears the Indian way to go fishing.
    Ohio Pennsylvania West Virginia Weather Fish Business Native American Studies The Ohio River
    Sep 5
    1803
    Lewis: Again it is fog that I awaken to in the morning. We loaded the canoes and waited until the fog disappeared. We had trouble passing some riffles today and had to use horse and oxen to rescue us. At six in the evening we were pounded by rain. We camped at the head of Brown's Island when the night blackened around us. I was very worried because much of our valuable belongings had not been brought up yet so I blew the trumpet and ordered our things to be secured. We traveled 16 miles today.
    Ohio West Virginia Weather The Ohio River
    Sep 6
    1803
    Lewis: As usual the fog enveloped us in the morning. A little after 7 we set out. We struck on a small riffle and within a few more miles passed 4 others, three of which we needed horses to drag us over. (The man "robbed" me of two dollars for his service!) At 2 o'clock we passed Steuwbenville without much excitement. Being 6 miles from encampment we hoisted our sail and let the wind carry us forward. We ran into another riffle and we hoped that the sail and wind would carry us over but to no avail. We again had to resort to horse and oxen. We proceeded about a mile and a half further before we made camp. We traveled ten miles today.
    Ohio West Virginia Business Keelboats Lewis & Clark Map: 09/06/1803
    Sep 7
    1803
    Lewis: According to custom we were awakened by fog this morning. Of course, within about 200 paces we were stuck on a riffle. All of the hands got out and moved the boat. We passed Charles Town (now Wellsburg, West Virginia) over which was built a beautiful wooden bridge. The town has the appearance of a little village of about forty houses. We reached Wheeling at about 5 in the evening. This village has about 50 houses and in the county town of Ohio (State of Virginia). On the side of the river where it empties out into the Ohio, stands an old stockade fort, now gone to decay. In this town of Wheeling I picked up some goods that I had ordered to be sent their and found them to be in order. I met with Col. Rodney briefly, one of the commissioners appointed by the government to adjust the land claims in the Mississippi Territory. We remained in this town all night..
    Ohio West Virginia Business Forts Keelboats Lewis & Clark Map: 09/07/1803
    Sep 8
    1803
    Lewis: Today, I wrote to President Jefferson. I also purchased a perogue and hired a man to work with her. I decided to give my men a days rest because they were very fatigued and I let them do laundry and buy some flour for bread. I dined with Col. Rodney and his suit and feasted on some juicy watermelons. I also met with Dr. Patterson who showed an interest to join our group, I consented. If Clark is unable to join us, he will fill his position as second lieutenant, although I must have the President's consent.
    Ohio West Virginia President Thomas Jefferson Business Watermelons The Ohio River
    Sep 9
    1803
    Lewis: The Doctor was unable to join us for the journey and we set out at three in the afternoon. We had some difficulty making it over a riffle a mile out of town. There was some mistake in the arrangement for bread at the town of Wheeling. The contract was misunderstood and the bread was left. I sent the Corporal back to get the bread and gave him a dollar to give the woman for her troubles. About that time torrential rain attacked us and continued into the night. Through the course of the night we tried to keep everything dry. The rain was unusually cold for this time of year.
    Ohio West Virginia Weather Food & Nutrition Business The Ohio River
    Sep 10
    1803
    Lewis: When morning woke the rain ceased. The clouds refused to disappear and looked they wanted to rain. There was only a little fog and I should have been able to set out early but we had to wait for the Corporal to return from Wheeling to get the bread. I began to worry that he had deserted because of the strong reprimand that I had given him. At 8 o'clock he did return and with the bread! We embarked! We passed several bad riffles and at 11 o'clock I landed on the east side of the river and went on shore. There we discovered an Indian grave about 700 paces from the river. The whole mound was covered with timber from sugar trees, hickory, poplar and red and white oak. I was informed that in removing some of the earth of one of the lesser mounds, two male skeletons were found and some brass beads. We again set off and ran into some bad riffles but we didn't need any help from cattle. We traveled about 24 miles today, the farthest yet. We stayed all night a little above sunfish creek.
    Ohio West Virginia Native American Studies The Ohio River
    Sep 11
    1803
    Lewis: We embarked at sunrise. We passed about five islands. I observed a number of black squirrels swimming the Ohio, swimming very light and at a very good speed. I assume they are moving south for the weather. Many were fat and when fried a very good food. My dog, a Newfoundland breed, enjoyed killing them and swim them back to me. Tonight we lay below the fifth island, having come 26 miles.
    Ohio West Virginia Squirrels Dog The Ohio River
    Sep 12
    1803
    Lewis: At sunrise we set out. It rained in intervals until three in the afternoon. We passed many bad riffles including Wilson's riffle. At this rifflewe had to channel through the gravel with spades and canoe paddles and drag the boat through. This took us about four hours. On the north-west shore I bought some potatoes and corn from a Yankee farmer in exchange for some lead. We came 20 miles today.
    Ohio West Virginia Weather Corn and Potatoes Business The Ohio River
    Sep 13
    1803
    Lewis: It was clear this morning so we set out at sunrise. We had to lift the boat over some riffles. I observed many pigeons passing over us moving south. The squirrels continue to cross the river from north-west to south-east. We arrived at Marietta which is a hundred miles from Wheeling. We will lay here all night and I wrote the President. I then dismissed two of my hands and hired two more. This evening I was visited by Col. Green, the postmaster of this town, he is much a gentleman and an excellent republican.
    Ohio West Virginia President Thomas Jefferson Squirrels Lewis & Clark Map: 09/13/1803
    Sep 14
    1803
    Lewis: We couldn't leave today until 11 o'clock because two of my men got drunk and we couldn't find them. When I found them I brought them on board, without their help being that they were so drunk. We passed several riffles and stayed the night on the north- west shore. It was here that we were informed of two women who had contracted malaria who lived on the bank just below. I saw many squirrels today and had my dog catch a few.
    Ohio West Virginia Squirrels Malaria
    Sep 15
    1803
    Lewis: We set out today at sunrise and passed the mouth of the little Kanaway which is one mile form where we camped last night. The mouth is about 60 yards wide and with a huge settlement on the bank. It rained buckets today, from about 7 this morning until 3 in the afternoon. We passed several bad riffles where we had to lift the boat over them, it sure slowed us up. One of the canoes fell far behind and we had to wait several hours for it to catch up with us. I noticed today many squirrels swimming the river although one was going the opposite direction, south-east to north-west. We settled down on the Virginia shore having made 18 miles today.
    Ohio West Virginia Squirrels Keelboats The Ohio River
    Sep 16
    1803
    Lewis: We didn't set out until 8 this morning because the fog hung over us like a thick cloak. The air stood at 54 degrees and the water at 72. The day ended up being fair. We passed several bad riffles, while my men were getting the boat out of a fairly long riffle at Emberson's Island, I went on shore and shot some squirrels. My men were quite fatigued after this battle with the riffle yet we continued on till nearly dark and settle on the Virginia shore, having made only 19 miles today.
    Ohio West Virginia Weather Squirrels Keelboats The Ohio River
    Sep 17
    1803
    Lewis: This morning it was very foggy, but we set out anyway because my pilot said that we had good water for several miles. After 7 miles we stopped at the Town Bar, which I was determined to spend the day and open and dry my goods which have been wet with rain since the 15th. Even the biscuit was in bad sorts.
    Ohio West Virginia The Ohio River
    Sep 18
    1803
    Lewis: The morning was clear and we set out at sunrise. At nine in the morning we passed Letart's Falls. The rapids are amazing here-a little more than 4 ft in 250 yards..
    Ohio West Virginia The Ohio River
    Oct 4
    1803
    Lewis: They have reached Big Bone Lick, Kentucky today. Lewis records information on the remains of a mastodon and other now extinct creatures and other fossils he studied while there.
    Indiana Kentucky Fossils The Ohio River Falls of the Ohio Bicentennial Commemoration
    Oct 14
    1803
    Since the last time Lewis' has written they have traveled through Clarksville, Indiana and Louisville, Kentucky. For the very first time William Clark has finally joined the expedition along with Clark's slave "York" and the "young men from Kentucky", including Joseph Field, Reubin Field, Charles Floyd, and George Gibson.
    Indiana Kentucky The Ohio River Falls of the Ohio Bicentennial Commemoration
  • Falls of the Ohio National Signature Event.
  • Nov 11
    1803
    Lewis: Arrived at Massac and employed George Drouillard as an Indian interpreter. I contracted to pay him $25 a month for his services. I advanced Mr. Swan $30, an assistant military agent in charge of financial affairs at this post, on account of his pay.
    Illinois Kentucky Business Native American Studies Lewis & Clark Map: 11/11/1803
    Nov 12
    1803
    Lewis: We remained at Massac. I took altitudes in the morning but I didn't finish because of the clouds.
    Illinois Kentucky Data Collection The Ohio River
    Nov 13
    1803
    Lewis: We left Massac at about 5 this evening and proceeded 3 miles down the river and camped on the south-east shore. It rained very hard tonight and I got sick with something. The fever went down by morning.

    Clark: Left Fort Massac at 4 o'clock.
    Illinois Kentucky Weather Health The Ohio River

    Nov 14
    1803
    Lewis: At first light we set out. I took a dose of Rush's pills (a strong laxative) which helped out a lot. By night my fever was gone. At about 12 o'clock we passed Wilkinson-ville, here was a great chain of rocks stretching its arm across the Ohio. We landed this evening where the Ohio and Mississippi meet. I feel much better now yet very weak.
    Illinois Kentucky Geology Health Lewis & Clark Map: 11/14/1803
    Nov 15
    1803
    Lewis: During the morning I took several altitudes, which takes a considerable amount of time, but couldn't finish because of clouds in the afternoon. Captain Clark make a partial survey of the point with a compass and projected the width of the Ohio.
    Illinois Kentucky Data Collection The Ohio River
    Nov 16
    1803
    Lewis: Today we passed the great Mississippi and went on the other side. It was here that the Shawnees and Delawares encamped. A Shawnee offered me three beaver skins for my dog, but I couldn't part with my companion. Clark and I scouted around the area and didn't return to camp until 1 o'clock. We were astounded at the size of a catfish the men had caught. The beauty weighed close to 128 lbs. Someone told me that some fish from the Ohio and Mississippi have weighed from 175 to 200 lbs. Later I encountered a prairie chicken, unfortunately I didn't have my gun.
    Illinois Missouri Fish Dog Prairie Chicken Business Shawnee Indians Delaware Indians The Ohio River The Mississippi River
    Nov 17
    1803
    Lewis: The wind in its fury blew all last night and through today. The canoes were flung in the arms of the torrential waters, driven also by the wind, and filled water. I measured the bank of the river to be 36 ft and 8 inches. The water level seemed very low.
    Illinois Missouri Weather Data Collection The Ohio River The Mississippi River
    Nov 18
    1803
    Lewis: We set out early this morning to visit and view where old Fort Jefferson stood. Our group included Clark and eight men. On and near an island were six Shawnee hunting camps, the island is formed by a bayou. At the junction of this bayou and a creed is the fort, which is on rising ground. On our return, we reached the huts of people who made their living by trading with the Indians. It was there we found some of our men who had left camp (against our instructions) and got drunk. We had much difficulty getting them.
    Illinois Missouri Shawnee Indians Forts The Ohio River The Mississippi River
    Nov 19
    1803
    Lewis: Today I took altitudes in the morning and the afternoon.
    Illinois Missouri Data Collection The Ohio River The Mississippi River
    Nov 20
    1803
    Lewis: Left in the morning and then got well into the stream. I then proceeded to make notes on our course, time and the estimated distances. There is a sandbar that extends from the island about 3/4 of a mile and reaches below the Ohio and Mississippi junction. We rested at the upper point of the island where my men sought refreshment and I observed the Meridian Altitude. We estimated 10 1/2 miles today.
    Illinois Missouri Data Collection The Ohio River The Mississippi River
    Nov 21
    1803
    Lewis: We set out at 7 o'clock this morning. Having traveled 7 miles I observed a great amount of misseltoe on the trees which border the river. I first observed this plant at the Muskingum river (which is where I got sick). I saw a number of black and white pided ducks (bufflehead duck) and I shot at one and crippled it but I could not find it then. Two deer came to the river to drink, we took advantage of the opportunity and shot at them. We didn't get either of them although one was wounded badly. About 50 miles below the mouth of the Ohio is Tanslagrass, from there is four islands. We stayed all night on the small island.
    Illinois Missouri Misletoe Bufflehead Ducks The Ohio River The Mississippi River
    Nov 22
    1803
    Lewis: We set out at 6:15 this morning. The current that greeted us was rapid and difficult. We again saw some heath hens on the side of the river. One of my men went on shore and killed one. This made some great soup for our Captain Clark who has been indisposed since the 16th. We reached a Spanish settlement, where we were informed by a Mr. Findley, the owner, that there were 15 families here. We overtook two keels from Louisville owned by Mr. Bullet of Louisville , headed to Kaskaskias, loaded with dry goods and whiskey. Later we met two keeled boats loaded with furs that were headed for New Orleans. The land here does not appear to be overflowed because of the poplar and white oak timber. This is the first poplar and white oak that I have seen. Sand and scrubbing Rush on the banks, seem to grow thicker and at a greater heights from the bottoms of the river than any where else. I have been told that it is good food for cattle and horses in the winter. The soil here is of an inferior quality being a stiff white clay. There is a quarry of white freestone on the eastern bank. The stones near the river are hard and formed of the sand of the river. The river also petrifies plant and animal alike. I have also observed petrified wood. For the night we stayed on a slate beach. One of me men, Nathaniel Pryor, went hunting and has not returned although we have sounded the horn. I saw some wood that seemed to be in a coal-state, but when it burned it emitted a sulfurous smell.
    Illinois Missouri Health Geology Heath Hen Trees The Mississippi River
    Nov 23
    1803
    Lewis: We waited until 7 o'clock but Pryor did not return, we left without him. We passed many creeks large and small. I don't know the names for these except the last one named East Lacrush, which is about 40 yards wide and 30 miles in length. We have passed three islands the first was Rock Island, although the last is really just a sandbar. Some parts of this island is covered with willows and small cottonwood. Just below the island is Cape Jeradeau. It was here that we called on the Commandt and delivered letters of introduction from Capt. Bisselle and Mr. Drewyer. When we arrived at his house we were told that he was at a horse race. We sought him out and when we found him he had already lost the main race. The Commandt had also lost four horses in the race, valued at $200. (This reminded me of the small races in Kentucky with the uncivilized backwoodsmen.) The Commdt. is Canadian by birth and was once a trader among the Shawnee and the Delawares. And in custom with the Canadian Traders, has taken a Indian wife, a Shawnee woman. By this woman he has a large family, one daughter is very pretty and probably the most descent female I have seen since I left the settlement in Kentucky a little below Louisville. We had dinner with the family and then the son led me back to me boat and people. I found Capt. Clark very unwell when I returned. We stayed the night here.
    Illinois Missouri Canada Health Shawnee Indians Delaware Indians The Mississippi River
    Nov 24
    1803
    Lewis: We set out at 7 o'clock this morning and as we were leaving we saw Pryor, the man who didn't return form hunting, and we took him into the boat. He was very fatigued and somewhat indisposed. My observations today were somewhat obscured because of clouds flying in front of the sun. This constant changing of the lighting had me taking my colored glasses on and off in order to make an accurate observation. The rock which makes up the cliffs here is not uncommon to this part of the country. It is limestone, a rock yellowish-brown in color. I am told that at Cape Jeradeau the same rock appears.
    Illinois Missouri Geology The Mississippi River
    Nov 25
    1803
    Lewis: A half after 6 o'clock we set out. The coast is higher today with the rock rising perpendicular and sometimes projecting from the water's edge. The rock is the same as yesterday with a larger amount of flint. All of the stone in this country seems to lie in horizontal stratas although forced or moved from there original place by the river. We passed several insignificant streams today. The country appears toe high with some low intervals, which appears to overflow in high water. We passed a small creek, just above this were some Shawnee huts and tents. From here we came to the Apple river, the most considerable stream yet. On this stream about 7 miles form its mouth was a small village of Shawnee. At the Cow River (Big Muddy River) there are many fine mines of pitt coal. Boats come here to transport it for use for blacksmiths and other artisans. On the high cliff rock of limestone are scattering pine, cedar and some oak Hickory. We arrived at the Grand Tower a little before sunset and went on shore for the night. This seems to be a place of the tropics or equinoxial line, those who are unfamiliar with it are always compelled to stop for a drink.
    Illinois Missouri Geology The Mississippi River
    Nov 26
    1803
    Lewis: We set out this morning a half after six. Parallel to the river is a bold looking range of hills about 250 ft high. Opposite of a stone quarry is the upper point of Hot Island, a small island in a oval form in the center of the river. The water is full of strong currents that will dash you quickly upon the rocks or suck you into a whirlpool
    Illinois Missouri The Mississippi River
    Nov 27
    1803
    Lewis: We left with the sunrise this morning. We approached the mouth of a river 3/4 of a mile down, there is a settlement (as many as three gristmills) and the high water is very navigable.

    Clark: Set out this morning at 8 o'clock from the lower point of Horse Island. We passed the mouth of the river at 8:15. The river here is held by a bold and rocky shore. The morning was quite misty, making observations difficult. We passed a small creek (St. Laurent Creek?). At 1 o'clock we passed Donohoes Landing where many boats receive salt from Saline Licks. We passed Saline Creek at 3 o'clock, which has a thick sediment on its waters. After passing some very swift waters between two sandbars, I arrived at the landing opposite old St. Genevie.
    Illinois Missouri The Mississippi River

    Nov 28
    1803
    Lewis: We left with the sunrise this morning. We approached the mouth of a river 3/4 of a mile down, there is a settlement (as many as three gristmills) and the high water is very navigable.
    Illinois Missouri The Mississippi River
    Dec 3
    1803
    Lewis: Continued my observations. We set out form the landing at 4:15 and passed an island in the middle of the river. We settled in after dark.
    Illinois Missouri The Mississippi River
    Dec 4
    1803
    Clark: We got quite an early start this morning, just a little before sunrise. After 3/4 of a mile we passed the small creek called Gabia, here was a landing place for the trading boats of St. Genevie. The village here contains 120 families, mostly French . 3/4 of a mile above Gabia Creek the high land juts to the river and forms a great cliff of rocks. It was here that I saw a cave, 12 ft in diameter and about 70 ft above the river. We eventually came to the Old Fort Charters where I took meridian altitude. At 1 o'clock we passed the upper point of Ft. Charles Isle where the channel that forms the island next to the fort is totally dry, it appears that it is filling up with sand and mud. The river here is wide with a high land of cliffs about 250 ft above the water.
    Illinois Missouri France Forts Geology The Mississippi River
    Dec 5
    1803
    Clark: Set out this morning just before sunrise. We passed the upper point of the island at about 2 miles. I have noticed several caves and a number of indented arches of different sizes in the cliffs, giving it a somewhat romantic appearance. We passed several small creeks. At the lower point of a large sand bar I took a meridian reading. We passed between two islands, one near the center of the river, a mile and a half in length. One was hiding the mouth of the large creek Platea which could afford water for mills. Here the emigration is very heavy, which is the same at Swacken Creek. One of the settlements above St. Geniesviur is where we stopped to have dinner. We had some difficulty passing a point of the river where the current threatened to toss the boat into the rocks. (The rock appears to be made up of grit.) We stopped at the Leagle Creek settlement to pick up some provisions which had been ordered to be sent there. I was informed by a Mr. Blear that nothing had arrived for me. I returned to the boat and proceeded on for another 1/2 mile to set up camp for the night.
    Illinois Missouri Geology Business The Mississippi River
    Dec 6
    1803
    Clark: It was a dark wet morning that I awoke to. I was told that Capt. Lewis and an officer passed by here yesterday on his way to St. Louis. At 11 o'clock we picked up a small supply of provisions and continued on. We passed many small creeks and islands today. One creek had a settlement on it called Rock Creek. We passed two islands and a small sandbar and then passed the Meremeck River. 3/4 of a mile after the Meremeck we came to a farm.
    Illinois Missouri Farming & Agriculture The Mississippi River
    Dec 7
    1803
    Clark: It was a dark and rainy morning again with a hard wind pounding our tired eyes. We set out at half past 7 with the winds at our backs. We passed a small island. At 10 o'clock the wind changed and gave us an opportunity to sail. At 12 o'clock the wind was so violent that it tore off our mast. We passed a small village named Viele Pauchr above the mouth of a large creek which contains many French families. At 3 o'clock we came to the Kohokia Landing which is at the mouth of the Kohokia Creek. We are in view of St. Louis which is 2 1/2 miles away.
    Illinois Missouri Weather Lewis & Clark Map: 12/07/1803
    Dec 10
    1803
    Clark: I took the meridian altitude at the landing opposite the town of Cahokia. The sun was very dim today which made observations difficult.
    Illinois Missouri Data Collection The Mississippi River
    Dec 11
    1803
    Clark: It was a very windy, rainy morning when we crossed the river to St. Louis. Capt. Lewis was detained to acquire information of the country and to sent dispatches to the government. At 11 o'clock I proceeded on, after a mile I passed two creeks. The wind changed at 3 o'clock to north-west. I passed several large sand bars in the middle of the river and camped on a large island. The rain came down until 3 today which threatens to over flow the banks of the river. The banks are falling where there is no rock.
    Illinois Missouri Weather Geology Government Lewis & Clark Map: 12/11/1803
    Dec 12
    1803
    Clark: The wind did not let up last night. We left this morning at 7 o'clock. At the opposite end of the island where we camped last night is a settlement. Some time before two we passed a little river called Wood River. At about 2 we were pounded by a storm of hail, snow and wind. We were then approached by two canoes of Potowautomi Indians, they were all drunk. Astonishing enough that although they were drunk they had managed to keep the water out of their canoe. The hunters that I had sent out, came back with turkey and possums. They reported that the country was beautiful and calm.
    Illinois Missouri Weather Potawatomi Turkey Possum
    Dec 13
    1803
    Clark: Tuesday - Prepared a place to build huts. Set the men off to clear land and cut logs. A hard wind blew all day. Some Indians passed by.
    Illinois Missouri Weather Native American Studies Camp DuBois
    Dec 14
    1803
    Clark: Wednesday - Continued cutting logs. Winds still blowing hard. River rising.
    Illinois Missouri Weather Camp DuBois
    Dec 15
    1803
    Clark: Thursday - I cut the road to the prairie 2490 yards to the East. Beginning to build cabins. One Indian came with m ters killed some grouse. Snow fell.
    Illinois Missouri Grouse Camp DuBois
    Dec 16
    1803
    Clark: Friday - Continuing to raise cabins. Sent Floyd and Cahokia off with letters to Captain Lewis to put in post office. Several boats came down the river today. A Pierogue came too, a Mr. Samuel Griffeth lives nine miles up the Missouri as well as a Mr. Gilbert, a trader in salt. The winds were high today, it was cloudy. We raised one cabin last night. I wrote a speech.
    Illinois Missouri Camp DuBois
    Dec 17
    1803
    Clark: Saturday - A cold, fine morning. Took equal altitudes: m m A. M. [38] 38 45 P. M. [3]2 20 41 do [3]8 41 59 " [3]2 21 46=32o 47' 45" do [3]8 43 1 " [3]2 23 45 Missed the altitude at 12 o'clock with the quadrant.
    Illinois Missouri Data Collection Camp DuBois
    Dec 18
    1803
    Clark: Sunday - Clear morning.
    Illinois Missouri Camp DuBois
    Dec 19
    1803
    Clark: Monday - Wagons came with the provisions this evening. Floyd returned with a letter from Captain Lewis.
    Illinois Missouri Business Camp DuBois
    Dec 20
    1803
    Clark: Tuesday - I detained the wagon to haul logs for my building. Hauled logs today with the commissaries team. Men moved into their huts this evening. Chronometer stopped last night. I wound it up at 12 today, and, as usual, it now goes. A hard frosty morning.
    Illinois Missouri Data Collection Camp DuBois
    Dec 21
    1803
    Clark: Wednesday - Cloudy day. Wagonner charged three dollars for his services yesterday. Sent Shields and Floyd out to hunt today. They killed seven very fat turkeys. I commenced putting up the logs for my cabin today. Water fell very fast.
    Illinois Missouri Turkey Business Camp DuBois
    Dec 22
    1803
    Clark: Thursday - Sleet this morning. River is covered with running ice, and fell very fast (15 inches last night.) The boat ran aground in the creek. I had pries fixed along to support the boat. All articles taken out and placed under guard on the bank. A letter from Captain Lewis arrived today along with a letter from Mr. Gratiot offering a horse and his services to Captain Lewis and myself in any way.
    Illinois Missouri Weather Camp DuBois
    Dec 23
    1803
    Clark: Friday - A rainy day. Work continued on huts. Men are tired from carrying logs. I sent to Mr. Morrison's farm for a team and corn, which arrived at about three o'clock. Mr. Griffeth came with a load of turnips. Drewyear came back today after a long hunt -- killed three deer and left them in the woods. Several Deleaway pass. A chief whom I saw at the Greenville Treaty was with them. I gave him a bottle of whiskey
    Illinois Missouri Delaware Indians Deer Food & Nutrition Weather Greenville Treaty Camp DuBois
    Dec 24
    1803
    Clark: Saturday - Cloudy. I bought a cargo of turnips. Men continue to put up huts. Drewyear returned with 3 deer and 5 turkeys. I sent Shields and Mr. Griffeth to the other side of the river to buy butter. Finished covering up our huts this evening. Found out that some of the party got drunk (2 fought.) The men frolicked and hunted all day today. Snow fell this morning. Shields came back with 4 pounds of butter and some cheese. Three Indians came to celebrate Christmas with us. I gave them a bottle of whiskey and the went off after they told me that all nations were going to war against the Ozous [Osage?] in 3 months.
    Illinois Missouri Native American Studies Deer Turkey Food & Nutrition Business Camp DuBois
    Dec 26
    1803
    Clark: Monday - Cloudy today. One of the party killed 7 turkeys last night at roost. Continue working at the huts. The ice ran... it was moderate today. Two men came home today at about 11 o'clock. Commenced sawing with whip saws.
    Illinois Missouri Turkey Camp DuBois
    Dec 27
    1803
    Clark: Tuesday - A fair day. I put goods and blankets out to dry and stored them apparently in good order. Nearly finished with my chimney today. Missed observation. Sent Drewyear out hunting today. He returned late with a buck -- said he saw three bear on the other side of the prairie.
    Illinois Missouri Deer Bear Camp DuBois
    Dec 28
    1803
    Clark: Wednesday - Cloudy. No ice on river. Drewyear killed a deer and the Indian killed another.
    Illinois Missouri Native American Studies Deer Camp DuBois
    Dec 29
    1803
    Clark: Thursday - Snowed this morning. Cloudy and wet all day. I finished my hut and wrote two letters today.
    Illinois Missouri Weather Camp DuBois
    Dec 30
    1803
    Clark: Friday - It snowed this morning. I moved my hut. Colter killed a deer and a turkey. Drewyear and Sargeant Odway set out for Kohokia. I arranged the guards on a new plan. I wrote to Captain Lewis.
    Illinois Missouri Deer Turkey Weather Camp DuBois
    Dec 31
    1803
    Clark: Saturday - Ordered liquor forbidden in camp today. Several things killed. Several men drunk. Began to snow at dark and continued until 9Jo'clock. Cloudy all day today.
    Illinois Missouri Weather Camp DuBois
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    This guide last edited 11/20/2006
    This guide last revised 10/23/2007
    This guide created 10/03/2004